Tag Archives: information literacy

CPD23: Once More, With Feeling. Or, Thing 5: Reflective Practice

18 Jun

Last year I started the 23 Things for Professional Development course, but got sidetracked after Thing 4. In fact, I got sidetracked from the blog entirely – I think I felt that I couldn’t post until I was ready to finish the 23 things! After a while it seemed too late to start back up again. However, I just realized that they’re holding the 23 Things course again this summer. It started a bit earlier this year than last, but since I already posted about Things 1-4 I’m only a bit behind if I jump in now. I hope that this will help me get back into the habit of regular blogging.

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Library podcasts

23 Oct

I love podcasts.

It took me a while to realize this, because I didn’t understand at first why anyone would be interested in a podcast at first. Then I started listening to podcasts of NPR shows on road trips – This American Life, RadioLab – and I was hooked. It didn’t take me long to hear about a relatively new library-related podcast called Adventures in Library Instruction, and I realized that podcasts can be a great way to squeeze in a little professional development on my commute. Continue reading

Libraries are about more than books, but so are librarians

17 Sep

UPDATE: A member of the Trinity community has clarified the situation there in the comments. It seems the library staff members who are being asked to leave are not librarians. The article itself was unclear, so I do appreciate being set straight!

I just read a troubling news story from the San Antonio News-Express, via ALA JobList on Facebook. Called “New chapter for libraries”, the article identifies a trend in academic libraries toward downsizing staff (at least in the San Antonio area). Apparently Trinity University is offering buyout packages to several of its library employees to leave, and several other area institutions are letting positions go unfilled when staff leave or retire. Trinity’s president, Dennis Ahlburg, links the reduction in staff to a reduced need for librarians with the increase in availability of digitized resources.

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